Hitting On All Cylinders!

KEY SCRIPTURE  

Exo. 2:11 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And it came to pass in those days, when Moses was grown, that he went out unto his brethren, and looked on their burdens: and he spied an Egyptian smiting an Hebrew, one of his brethren. 12 And he looked this way and that way, and when he saw that there was no man, he slew the Egyptian, and hid him in the sand. 13 And when he went out the second day, behold, two men of the Hebrews strove together: and he said to him that did the wrong, Wherefore smitest thou thy fellow? 14 And he said, Who made thee a prince and a judge over us? intendest thou to kill me, as thou killedst the Egyptian? And Moses feared, and said, Surely this thing is known.

Why do we recognize some people as being good in their “craft”? Take a singer for instance; if he mumbles in a monosyllabic, monotonic manner, we’ll probably not be impressed. If the next singer doesn’t mumble, he’ll probably be considered better than the first one. If the third singer doesn’t mumble and has a nicer “flow”, he’ll probably beat the first two. Finally, if the fourth singer can also add melody to his voice in addition to the other two skills, he might get “4 STARS!” from the judges. As the winner, this singer could go on to bigger and better things including fame and fortune. This last singer, more so than the others, is “hitting on all cylinders”, and exhibits a higher degree of excellence.

Receiving “greater blessings” may sometime require us to overcome “insurmountable” odds, and even TERRIBLE mistakes! A young couple indulges in pre-marital sex which produces a child before they themselves were able to finish high school. This conception was not planned, and yet this child grows up and makes an impressive mark on the world! While this is only a fictional account, let’s look at the story of Anthony A. Williams (1951-) an African-American politician, this being BLACK HISTORY MONTH.

Williams was born in Los Angeles and was adopted by Virginia and Lewis Williams, one of eight children in the family. He graduated magna cum laude from Yale and went on to get a doctorate in law from Harvard and masters in public policy from Harvard. His career has been mostly in financial administration, but he also served in the US Air Force and as an adjunct professor at Columbia University. He entered the administration of the District of Columbia and rose to become its chief financial officer in 1995, before being elected mayor in 1998 (http://www.dil.aber.ac.uk/dils/Research/RFocus9/html_a_k.htm#ltrD).  

Slave mentality tries to prevent us from achieving our purpose to be “fruitful and multiply” beyond a nominal level, and may be induced by breeding. However, another obstacle to faith in the ability to generate prosperity in every area of life stems from the lack of recognition of successful members of your ilk. To see Mr. Williams reach such a high level in his education and career has to be inspirational to other disadvantaged African-Americans. Beyond that, an adoptee shouldn’t feel that life will necessarily result in disenfranchisement, poverty, or criminality. Hopefully, this story may also inspire Blacks to adopt more.

To reach parity with White & Hispanics, Blacks would have to adopt 44 kids per 10,000 families to their 6. 

Referring to Exodus 2 we find the birth of Moses (drawn out of the water) and the favor which allows his life to be spared. “For whoso findeth me findeth life, and shall obtain favour of the Lord 

 

 

(Prv. 8:35).” This verse extols the virtue of wisdom, which would truly be demonstrated in the life of this baby who was found by Pharaoh’s daughter! Remarkably, his mother is able to become his nurse for his adoptive mother. For us to appreciate the exposure he received from his moms, especially as it relates to leadership, let’s consider the following example.

While playing alone, Lil’ Johnny was approached by another kid who said, “I know how much two plus two is.” Lil’ Johnny asked, “how much?” The kid replied, “four!” An awe-struck Lil’ Johnny then asked, “for real?!” A second child joins in and says, “I know how much two plus two plus two is.” Lil’ Johnny asked, “how much?” The second child said “six”, to which Lil’ Johnny asked again, “for real?!” Another kid said, “I know how much two plus two plus two plus two is.” Once again Lil’ Johnny asked “how much?” to a response of “eight”. And again Lil’ Johnny asked, “for real?” That’s when a slightly older child approached their group and stated, “I can show you how to get eight with just three two’s.” As the other little kids argued back and forth that it couldn‘t be done, all Lil’ Johnny could do was watch intently. The older kid then put a small three on top of the two, and explained that it means to multiply two times two times two. Upon realizing that the older child had told them the truth, the younger children exclaimed, “awesome”, except for Lil’ Johnny who could only use both his hands to hold his head in amazement.

Soon Lil’ Johnny starts school, and the teacher asks, “class, how much is two plus two?”. Only he knows. In the next grade the teacher asks “how much is two times two?”, and only he knows the correct answer. Eventually he reaches a grade where the question is “what is the logarithm of two?” None of the other students bother to raise their hand, they just look to Lil’ Johnny who answered “.301029996”! The whole class went, “WOW!” By being in “good company” Lil’ Johnny was much more advanced than his class.

 

Moses was exposed to royalty and slavery, which to some degree prepared him to be Israel’s first Pastor. However, in the KEY SCRIPTURE Moses kills an Egyptian, and thought erroneously that he had got away with it. Sometimes we think that we are hiding our inequities without realizing that in a lot of cases that’s simply isn’t the case. This certainly portrays the situation Moses was in, but more importantly, it causes him to flee in humility – another necessary trait to becoming a good leader. Surely this experience taught him to have compassion, which would certainly make him a more complete leader. He must have carried himself like a man of great stature to be asked, “who made thee a prince and a judge over us? ” in verse 14

Moses was exposed to royalty and slavery, which to some degree prepared him to be Israel’s first Pastor. However, in the KEY SCRIPTURE Moses kills an Egyptian, and thought erroneously that he had got away with it. Sometimes we think that we are hiding our inequities without realizing that in a lot of cases that’s simply isn’t the case. This certainly portrays the situation Moses was in, but more importantly, it causes him to flee in humility – another necessary trait to becoming a good leader. Surely this experience taught him to have compassion, which would certainly make him a more complete leader. He must have carried himself like a man of great stature to be asked, “who made thee a prince and a judge over us? ” in verse 14

 

 

He probably had the kind of physical presence that commands respect. In short, it appears that he indeed was hitting on all cylinders!”

Another strong point to consider in the analogy of the singers deals with how well we identify with them. It is most likely that the singer we choose will be the one we feel we can, or would like to, relate to the most. Like all of us Moses made a mistake (albeit his mishap resulted in the death of a human being; this incident was of course pre-Law). He had to deal with being an adopted kid, who are usually unaware of their origin, uncertain of their purpose, and unknowing of their destiny! Even today we can identify with him as confusion plays a role in the life of everyone of us. From the beginning God had “ordered the steps of a good man (Psa. 37:23)”, Moses in this case. To just view his humble start it would have been impossible to see him becoming what he became – a highly venerable (esteemed) servant of the Lord.  

Why don’t blind people skydive? Because it scares their dogs! Seriously, they don’t have the required ocular gift of sight. God blesses us with gifts to help our fellow man out of their bondage. Sometimes that may very well mean leaving our comfort zone. Moses was raised as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter, but he showed a compassion by intervening in a fight between two slaves in 

 

 

verse 13 of the KEY SCRIPTURE. On another level, the story of Moses and how he delivered Israel from Egyptian bondage, is replicated in the story of Jesus and how He delivers from the bondage of sin. However, those of us who profess to have faith in Christ have also been commissioned to “go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit…(Mat. 28:19).” 

Imagine how effective you could be in making disciples as God’s servant “hitting on all cylinders”. Perhaps you were the last one picked for the team, or you weren’t the homecoming queen at you school. One thing we can clearly see from this story is that your beginning is NOT a hindrance to your future!  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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